Academic Catalog

Core Curriculum

MCLA’s core curriculum provides a practical and interdisciplinary education that challenges students to develop themselves as thinkers, readers, writers, communicators, and problem solvers. Moreover, the core curriculum prepares students for a diverse world, for professional and personal success by helping students to think critically, and to make informed, self-directed decisions, which will prepare them for lives of civic responsibility. MCLA’s core curriculum comprises three tiers. Tier I develops foundational skills including writing, reasoning, and language development. Tier II exposes students to coursework within each of four domains including creative arts, human heritage, self and society, and science and technology. Tier III is a culminating capstone experience. Domain level courses will engage students in:

  • Comprehending the possibilities and limitations of various fields of human inquiry;
  • Understanding the complex interplay of beliefs, values and practices that characterize disciplined systems of knowledge;
  • Adopting diverse perspectives to function in our multicultural world.

Core Curriculum Requirements

Tier I Core Foundations
Critical Reading, Thinking, Writing3
Quantitative Reasoning3
Language Arts3
Tier II Core Domains
Creative Arts6
Human Heritage6
Self & Society6
Science & Technology (Two courses — at least one must have laboratory)7-8
Tier III Capstone Experience3
Total Hours37-38

Tier 1 Core Foundations

Tier I - Core Foundations Critical Reading, Thinking, Writing
ENGL 150College Writing II3
Quantitative Reasoning
MATH 102Mathematics for Liberal Arts3
MATH 150Precalculus3
MATH 220Calculus I3
MATH 232Introduction to Statistics3
Language Arts
FREN 102Elementary French II3
ITAL 102Elementary Italian II3
MODL 102Special Topics in Modern Language3
SPAN 102Elementary Spanish II3

Quantitative Reasoning
Upon successful completion of a Tier I quantitative course, students will be able to, in multiple contexts:

  • Explain information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words);
  • Skillfully convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words);
  • Make calculations clearly, concisely, and correctly;
  • Make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on analysis of quantitative data, and realize the limits of this analysis;
  • Competently employ estimations of quantities;
  • Present quantitative information in connection with their work, employing an effective format and thoroughly contextualizing the explanations.

Language Arts
All students must complete a foreign/modern language course at the 102 level (second semester elementary level) or demonstrate proficiency at or above the second semester elementary level (e.g. through an assessment process). Entering students who have passed, with at least a C average, the equivalent of a fourth year level of a foreign/modern language are waived from MCLA’s language arts requirement.  Entering students who have not met the fourth year level of the same foreign/modern language will take a Modern Language Placement Test and be placed accordingly.  Alternatively, students can elect to begin study of a new language at the first-semester elementary level (101) and subsequently complete the second semester elementary level (102) course in the same language.

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, students with disabilities (as identified through Learning Services) will be advised to select an alternative course to fulfill their Tier I Language Arts requirement.

This course may be taken at any level and will be drawn from a list of courses that foster an understanding and appreciation of culture other than our own, including, but not limited to; anthropology, social geography, travel, history and language (non-speaking) appreciation courses. Appropriate courses will be selected in consultation with language and other appropriate academic departments.

Tier II - Core Domains

Creative Arts

Upon completion of the creative arts domain requirements students will be able to:  

  • Describe techniques, processes, and concepts that creative artists use in their work;
  • Discuss personal encounters with the creative arts within broader historical and cultural contexts;
  • Articulate the significance of the creative arts, artistic expression, and experience in today’s world.
Courses Fulfilling Creative Arts Tier II Domain
CCCA 101Creative Arts: Methods and History3
CCCA 102The Art of Madness3
CCCA 110Topics in Creative Arts3
CCCA 202The Good Earth: The Theme of Agrarianism3
CCCA 203Inventing Modernism3
CCCA 205Popular Hollywood Films: 1950s3
CCCA 206Rumi's Vision3
CCCA 207Children's Literature: A Lively Art3
CCCA 209Contemporary American Poetry and The Times3
Departmental Courses Fulfilling Creative Arts Tier II Domain
ART 201Studio: Art & Society3
ARTH 117Introduction to Art History3
ARTH 217Contemporary Art3
DANC 100Introduction to Dance3
ENGL 210Essentials of Film3
ENGL 250Introduction to Literature3
ENGL 270Literary Genre3
MUSI 251Introduction to Music3
MUSI 253World Music3
THEA 120Introduction to Performance3
THEA 200Introduction to Theatre3
PHIL 120Art and Philosophy3
PHIL 120HHonors: Art and Philosophy3

Human Heritage

Upon completion of the human heritage domain requirements students will be able to:

  • Apply critical and comparative approaches to primary and secondary sources;
  • Draw valid conclusions from documentary evidence and evaluate the significance of such conclusions;
  • Evaluate the significance of events, ideas, or circumstances in a given text both within their own and contemporary contexts.
Courses Fulfilling Human Heritage Tier II Domain
CCHH 101Utopian Visions Fact and Fiction3
CCHH 110Topics in Human Heritage3
CCHH 210American Women Regionalist Writers3
CCHH 220Popular History and Biography3
CCHH 221Divine Witness3
CCHH 223The Great Depression3
CCHH 230Introduction to Latinx Studies3
Departmental Courses Fulfilling Human Heritage Tier II Domain
ENGL 207Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3
ENGL 265Literary Theme3
HIST 104Modern World Civilization3
HIST 113United States History to 18773
HIST 114United States History after 18773
HIST 125World Regional Geography3
HIST 220Reformers, Rebels, Revolutionaries in East Asia3
HIST 230War, Science, and Society3
HIST 240Reacting to the Past3
HIST 250Museums, Monuments & Memory3
HONR 100The Nature of Human Nature3
IDST 150Introduction to Cross-Cultural & Social Justice Studies3
PHIL 100A First Course in Philosophy3
PHIL 110World Religions3
PHIL 110HHonors: World Religions3
PHIL 200Logic and Critical Reasoning3
PHIL 200HHonors: Logic and Critical Reasoning3

Self and Society

Upon completion of the self & society requirements students will be able to:

  • Identify the values and assumptions in a particular social setting and compare them with one’s own cultural context;
  • Utilize inter-disciplinary perspectives, theories and social science methods to analyze significant social issues;
  • Develop and present an analysis of the multiple factors that explain an individual’s relationship to society.
Courses Fulfilling Self and Society Tier II Domain
CCSS 101Contemporary Issues in Society3
CCSS 102Snapshots of Society3
CCSS 110Topics in Self and Society3
CCSS 202World Regions and the New Global Order3
CCSS 210Landscapes of Human Activities3
CCSS 260Schools, the Law and Society3
CCSS 264Mathematics of Fairness and Equity3
CCSS 264HHonors: Mathematics of Fairness and Equity3
CCSS 268Culture and the Body3
CCSS 269Education and Society3
Departmental Courses Fulfilling Self and Society Tier II Domain
ANTH 130Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology3
ANTH 240Peoples of the World3
BADM 100Explorations in Business3
COMM 204Media Self-Identity & Society3
ECON 141Macroeconomics3
ENGL 231The Power of Words3
HLTH 150Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HLTH 150HHonors: Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HLTH 210Human Growth and Development3
IDST 299Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies3
POSC 201United States Government3
POSC 202Comparative Government3
PSYC 100Introduction to Psychology3
PSYC 230Social Psychology3
SOCI 100Introduction to Sociology3
SOCI 201Social Problems3
SOCI 210Families3
SOCI 282Social Constructions of Deviance3
WGSS 201Introduction to Women Gender and Sexuality Studies3

Science and Technology

Upon completion of the science and technology requirements students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of natural science content;
  • Apply content knowledge to solve problems and make informed decisions;
  • Communicate scientific findings orally and/or in writing;
  • Interpret and generate graphs from scientific data;
  • Apply scientific practices to test a hypothesis or answer a question;
  • Find media (e.g., popular or scholarly literature) focusing on scientific topics and evaluate the reliability of the source.
Courses Fulfilling Science and Technology Tier II Domain
CCST 101Topics in Physical Science3
CCST 102A Case Study Approach to Science3
CCST 103Quarks to Quasars3
CCST 105The Chemistry of CSI3
CCST 105HHonors: The Chemistry of CSI3
CCST 106The Physics of Superheroes3
CCST 110Topics in Physical Science with Laboratory4
CCST 111Topics in Life Science3
CCST 112Topics in Life Science with Lab4
CCST 230Energy and the Environment4
Departmental Courses Fulfilling Science & Technology Tier II Domain
BIOL 100Concepts in Biology4
BIOL 102Nutrition for Healthy Living with Lab4
BIOL 103Nutrition for Healthy Living3
BIOL 105Human Biology3
BIOL 150Introduction to Biology I: Cells4
BIOL 255Biodiversity4
CHEM 150Introduction to Chemistry I4
CHEM 152Introduction to Chemistry II4
ENVI 150Introduction to Environmental Systems4
ENVI 150HHonors: Introduction to Environmental Systems4
ENVI 225Nature of New England4
ENVI 226Nature of New England3
ERTH 151Introduction to Physical Geography4
ERTH 152Introduction to Physical Geology4
ERTH 245Natural Hazards3
ERTH 270Weather and Climate3
ERTH 271Landforms4
HLTH 201Exercise Science3
PHYS 120Introduction to Engineering4
PHYS 131General Physics I4
PHYS 132General Physics II4
PHYS 140Astronomy3
PHYS 151Introduction to Mechanics4
PHYS 251Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism4

Tier III - Capstone Experience

In the Capstone Senior Seminar students apply academic learning to the context of contemporary local and global communities.

Upon completion of the CCAP 300 Capstone Seminar: students will be able to:

  • Acquire and evaluate information from multiple and varied information sources that integrates two or more Tier II domains;
  • Apply academic learning to the context of contemporary local and/or global communities;
  • Investigate and analyze complex problems/issues and draw reasoned conclusions, providing comprehensive support for those conclusions;
  • Effectively communicate ideas, solutions, and plans through a variety of media that must include a substantial writing component;
  • Work effectively in collaboration with fellow students and/or community entities to create a product that demonstrates the student is able to connect academic learning and critical thinking skills with problems in the context of today’s world.

Recent Tier III Offerings

  • Ethical Issues in Health Care
  • Picturing Animals
  • Feminism and Theatre
  • From DNA to Homo Sapiens
  • Berkshire Art, Industry & Tourism
  • Service Leadership
  • News Literacy
  • Light, Sight, & Insight
  • Entrepreneurship & Culture
  • Food, Nutrition, & Culture
  • The Creative Economy of the Berkshires
  • Film as Philosophy
  • Conversations on Race in American Society
  • Community Engagement in the Arts

Language Arts

FREN 102 Elementary French II3 cr

Improves fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing French. Students will increase their command of the standard topics of French grammar. Short readings will enhance understanding and appreciation of French-speaking cultures and provide topics of conversation. Second half of a one-year course. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 101 or department approval  
Attributes: Language Arts (CLA)  
ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II3 cr

This course is a continuation of Italian 101. Speaking, listening, reading and writing skills are emphasized. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITAL 101  
Attributes: Language Arts (CLA)  
MODL 102 Special Topics in Modern Language3 cr

Examines fundamental concepts regarding the relationship of the individual to language and culture. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Language Arts (CLA)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II3 cr

Reviews first-semester Spanish and continues the comprehension and oral communication begun in Spanish 101. Intended for those who have already experienced a basic Spanish course. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or equivalent  
Attributes: Language Arts (CLA)  

Quantitative Reasoning

MATH 102 Mathematics for Liberal Arts3 cr

Presents mathematics topics designed to promote mathematical problem solving, reasoning, decision making and communication. Students will develop an understanding of the nature, purposes and accomplishments of mathematics. Topics selected from elementary set theory, logic, number theory, graph theory, voting theory, functions, difference equations and geometry.

Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning (CMA)  
MATH 150 Precalculus3 cr

Introduces topics necessary for the study of calculus. A detailed study of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, and their applications to modeling real world problems. Topics are considered from analytical, graphical and numerical points of view.

Prerequisite: Placement based on SAT scores and high school background  
Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning (CMA)  
MATH 220 Calculus I3 cr

Examines limits, continuity, the derivative, differentiation of elementary functions, applications of the derivative and an introduction to the antiderivative. The first of a four-part sequence.

Prerequisite: MATH 150, placement based on SAT and high school background or department approval  
Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning (CMA)  
MATH 232 Introduction to Statistics3 cr

Examines descriptive statistics, probability, sampling theory and inferential statistics. Mathematics majors cannot use this course for credit towards their major.

Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning (CMA)  

Critical Reading, Thinking, Writing

ENGL 150 College Writing II3 cr

Emphasizes college-level writing, reading, research and revision practices necessary for 21st century academic and civic engagement. Teaches students to use a variety of genres, rhetorical techniques, and sources of evidence to reach academic and civic audiences.

Prerequisite: ENGL 100  
Attributes: Critical Read, Think, Write (CWR)  

Creative Arts

ART 201 Studio: Art & Society3 cr

Focuses on potential impacts of visual arts in both societal and personalized contexts through the introduction and understanding of basic drawing techniques, first-hand art experiences, research and writing. Students will be required to explore image-making, as well as writing, to express original ideas and to enhance critical thought, observation, and analysis of existing artwork, explaining and discussing the contexts in which an artwork was made and is viewed. Intended for non-art majors.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ARTH 117 Introduction to Art History3 cr

Introduces art, architecture, and sculpture from prehistory to the present. Focuses on the art of the West with additional discussion of non-Western cultures. Examines major works and artists within their historical, social, and political contexts while tracing principle art movements. Also explores materials and techniques of art making. Course may include field trips to local museums.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ARTH 217 Contemporary Art3 cr

Introduces contemporary art. Presents major artists in cultural, historical, and political contexts. Topics may include the changing nature of the avant-garde, the roles of the critic and the economic market, new forms of art making, and the expanding conceptions of creative self-expression, particularly with regards to gender identity and race. Course may include field trips to MASS MoCA and other local sites of contemporary art.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 101 Creative Arts: Methods and History3 cr

What are the creative arts? How are they made, by whom and why? What are some major examples of the arts? The course will attempt to answer these questions through an interdisciplinary study of the eight arts (pictures, sculpture, music, theatre, film, dance, architecture and literature) and their relation to society in the past, in the present and in the varieties of world civilizations.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 102 The Art of Madness3 cr

Examines myths and realities of madness from the perspective of the creative arts (e.g., art, literature, film, poetry). Explores a variety of artistic forms from the viewpoint of the artist and observer in studying the dimensions of maladaptive traits and behaviors. Emphasis is on critical thinking and analysis of the subject matter, the creator and the artistic medium within which it is portrayed.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 110 Topics in Creative Arts3 cr

Examines fundamental concepts regarding the relationship of the individual to the creative arts. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCCA 202 The Good Earth: The Theme of Agrarianism3 cr

Studies agrarian themes and their importance by surveying literature, music, paintings, and photography. Focuses on artistic perceptions of the earth and human relationships to it. Explores agrarian traditions, values and beliefs. Includes a study of agrarian social, political and economic issues.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
CCCA 203 Inventing Modernism3 cr

Surveys art works from this dominant twentieth century philosophy and arts movement by considering how its values and aesthetic ideals shaped film, painting, communication, fashion, theatre and architecture. Investigates such thinkers and artists as Freud, Gropius, Klimt and Schiele.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 205 Popular Hollywood Films: 1950s3 cr

Uses the basic concepts and insights of the creative arts to examine the ways in which American popular film of the 1950s incorporates ideas and societal reality into its modes of representation. Explores the relationships between American films and American popular culture.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 206 Rumi's Vision3 cr

Studies the poetry, life, and times of the great 13th century Sufi mystic, Jelaluddin Rumi. This is a course for students who want to expand their horizons and explore a view of reality that is not based on secular materialism. Because of excellent modern translations, Rumi is rapidly becoming one of the most relevant and powerful poets of our time.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 207 Children's Literature: A Lively Art3 cr

Develops a critical understanding of the verbal and visual art of children's literature. Reflects major stories of world art and literature through two centuries of English language publications. Includes novels, short stories (including folk tales) and picture books. Readings will be placed in historical, cultural and literary contexts, with emphasis on techniques of writing and publishing, as well as pedagogical philosophies.

Attributes: Child & Family Studies Minor (C&FS), Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
CCCA 209 Contemporary American Poetry and The Times3 cr

Covers American Poetry from the 1950s to the present and focuses on how American poetry reflected the cultural and political life in the United States from 1956 into the next millennium. Areas covered will be; poetry's connection with the other arts (particularly music and the visual arts), poetry and politics, poetry and race, and the resurgence of the oral tradition. Students will compose their own poems in order to better understand the creative process.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
DANC 100 Introduction to Dance3 cr

Introduces students to the basics of ballet and modern dance technique, as well as offer an overview of the history of those genres.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 210 Essentials of Film3 cr

Focuses on film interpretation by emphasizing elements such as light, sound, composition, camera movement, acting, and direction. Initiates students into developments in film history, film genre and film theory.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 250 Introduction to Literature3 cr

Seeks to develop each student's ability to understand and respond to a variety of literary texts by repeated practice in textual explication through discussion and written work. While most readings will be drawn from poetry, drama and prose fiction, the course will also embrace, where appropriate, texts drawn from mass media. (English/communications majors may not take ENGL 250 to fulfill their Creative Arts Core Curriculum requirement.)

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 270 Literary Genre3 cr

Examines the question of how an author's choice of a single literary mode, genre, or type affects the meanings of a text. May focus on plays, short stories, song lyrics, comedy, romance, novels, myths, or other genres. The specific genre to be examined will vary and will be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
MUSI 251 Introduction to Music3 cr

Provides a general historical survey of music and introduces basic music theory. The objective of the course is to help students become conversant in the styles and genres of music in the history of western civilization. Popular music styles are discussed in their historical context as well as for their influences on contemporary culture.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
MUSI 253 World Music3 cr

Compares world music and the study of music in the context of culture. Introduces students to the field of ethnomusicology and explores the folk and classical music of Asia, the Balkans, the Americans, and the wealth of ethnic culture in the North Adams area.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
PHIL 120 Art and Philosophy3 cr

Adopts a philosophical approach to the experience, understanding and critical assessment of the products and processes of the creative arts. Our inquiries will center on two traditional questions of aesthetic theory: What is art? What is art's special value? This course will be more theoretical than hands-on, though direct, continued experience in the various creative arts will be encouraged and figure prominently in most discussions and assignments.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
PHIL 120H Honors: Art and Philosophy3 cr

Adopts a philosophical approach to the experience, understanding and critical assessment of the products and processes of the creative arts. Our inquiries will center on two traditional questions of aesthetic theory. What is art? What is art's special value? This course will be more theoretical than hands-on, though direct, continued experience in the various creative arts will be encouraged and figure prominently in most discussions and assignments.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA), Honors Program (HONR)  
THEA 120 Introduction to Performance3 cr

Introduces the fundamentals of stage performance. Improvisation, relaxation, and character exercises build awareness of skills necessary for successful live performance. Presents basic acting vocabulary/theory. Develops confidence performing in front of others. Includes readings, plays in context, viewing of live theatre, and short writing assignments. Fosters more informed observers of performance experience.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
THEA 200 Introduction to Theatre3 cr

Surveys historical development of world theatre emphasizing western dramatic tradition. Introduces a broad range of theatrical literature and theory within its historical context. Includes class discussions and writing assignments, as well as viewing of live theatre, panel discussions, and critical response sessions.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  

Human Heritage

CCHH 101 Utopian Visions Fact and Fiction3 cr

Involves a study of Utopian visions of the past and present, both real and imaginary, and connects these visions to four major American protest movements. Incorporates sources ranging from the Declaration of Independence to the songs of Bob Dylan.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
CCHH 110 Topics in Human Heritage3 cr

Examines fundamental concepts regarding the relationship of the individual to humanity's shared heritage. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCHH 210 American Women Regionalist Writers3 cr

Studies the texts of mid-to-late 19th century women regional writers in their historical, political and social contexts. Students will read extensively in both primary and secondary texts of the period to heighten their understanding of how it is that literary history is both shaped and understood, as well as how these particular women writers resisted the then mainstream prescription for an American literary project.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
CCHH 220 Popular History and Biography3 cr

Examines history in non-fiction prose works intended for a broad audience of intelligent but not expert readers. It looks at the kind and value of information in primary sources, and how secondary sources document them. Primary sources may include letters, diaries, memoirs, speeches, still and moving photographs, drawings, certificates, posters, maps to help distinguish the different kinds of information revealed in secondary sources.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
CCHH 221 Divine Witness3 cr

Explores the history of revelation as a fundamental way of knowing. Reviews important moments in history when divine witness played a part in shaping civilizations or altering the prevailing sense of reality. Features readings from a variety of texts drawn from many spiritual and esoteric traditions.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
CCHH 223 The Great Depression3 cr

Examines the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary and other aspects of the great American depression of the 1930s. Examines the cause and effect of change and persistence during a time of national crisis. Readings are first-hand accounts, documentaries, narratives and explanatory fiction.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
CCHH 230 Introduction to Latinx Studies3 cr

Examines the United States, and the histories, cultures, and experiences of Americans of Latin American ancestry. Latinx studies is an interdisciplinary academic field that explores the politics, health, representation, and practices of people from Latin American and Caribbean heritage living in the United States. Latinx studies offers a lens through which we can better understand connections between diverse Latinx groups as well as the differences that may come between them.

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Human Heritage (CHH), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
ENGL 207 Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3 cr

Explores the methodological and thematic evolution of American and Ethnic Studies. We will ask: Who is an American? What does it mean to be American? We will approach this task through a critical vantage point that considers the impacts of race, class, gender, and sexuality on "Americanness." We will also explore how economics, empire, racism, transnationalism, and imperialism all impact our definitions of "Americanness."

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
ENGL 265 Literary Theme3 cr

Utilizes both primary and secondary literary and historical sources to explore ways in which a selected theme continually reappears in literature. Texts are examined, interpreted and evaluated within historical contexts; critical and comparative approaches are used to draw conclusions regarding content and context. The specific theme to be examined will vary and will be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
HIST 104 Modern World Civilization3 cr

Provides an introductory historical survey of the major events, ideas and people which have shaped world civilizations since 1500, the beginning of the modern era of history. Takes a comparative, interdisciplinary, and non-Eurocentric approach to historical analysis emphasizing diversity and global awareness.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 113 United States History to 18773 cr

Focuses on the development of American political, economic, social, philosophical, and cultural values and institutions from Colonial beginnings up to 1877. Sufficient emphasis will be placed on the Massachusetts and Federal Constitutions to meet the state requirement.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 114 United States History after 18773 cr

Focuses on the development of American political, economic, social, philosophical, and cultural values and institutions from 1877 to the present. Sufficient emphasis will be placed on the Massachusetts and Federal Constitutions to meet the state requirement.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 125 World Regional Geography3 cr

Introduces theories, terms and past and contemporary topics in human geography, including how cultures are born and change, how groups of people organize themselves and their activities both spatially and politically, how patterns of activities emerge and change across time and space, and how we interact with our environments. Students in this course will explore demographic, economic, and social trends and issues across the globe in their geographic and historical context.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 220 Reformers, Rebels, Revolutionaries in East Asia3 cr

Using a "lives and times" approach, this course will introduce to students some men and women whose lives reflect major social, cultural, political and economic developments in the modern history of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam). These individuals were uniquely positioned to influence history when their society experienced profound transition and transformation through imperialism, industrialization, wars, and social conflicts.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 230 War, Science, and Society3 cr

Using a variety of case studies from European and world history, this course concentrates on increasing students' understanding of how conflict and scientific innovation have combined to change societies. Students will research and analyze a broad range of source materials to develop their ability to construct arguments and interpretations and express them logically and persuasively in speech and writing. Possible topics include atomic energy, medicine, transportation, and weaponry.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 240 Reacting to the Past3 cr

Explores selected periods in American history using elaborate, role playing historical games based in the American past. This course seeks to draw students into engaging the past, developing their understanding and analysis of historical sources, and improving skills in speaking, writing, and leadership. The games covered in the course will vary from semester to semester.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HIST 250 Museums, Monuments & Memory3 cr

Explores the ways that we remember the past. Students will engage with artifacts, museums, public symbols like monuments, and events meaningful to their own histories. They will work with local organizations to learn new methods of preserving history and presenting it to public audiences. Using a variety of case studies, this collaborative course will confront debates about the politics of history and explore how diverse audiences interact with history and historical memory.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
HONR 100 The Nature of Human Nature3 cr

Explores the problematic notion of human nature employing the open-ended question-asking and interdisciplinary discussion which characterizes the Honors Program. The course ranges widely over philosophical, psychological, literary and anthropological texts, as well as works of art, which propose competing definitions for human nature. Students are asked first to understand and then to criticize each perspective in turn and finally to formulate their own understanding of human nature.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH), Honors Program (HONR)  
IDST 150 Introduction to Cross-Cultural & Social Justice Studies3 cr

Opens up a perspective on the history, contemporary experience and cultural diversity of the major ethnic groups/immigrant groups that make up the American Mosaic, while also discussing issues of social justice and inequality. The focus is on the U.S. experience, but the course will also discuss the experience of minority groups in other parts of the world through selected case studies.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
PHIL 100 A First Course in Philosophy3 cr

Engages students in the critical investigation and reflective analysis of such fundamental philosophical questions as freedom and moral responsibility, the nature of being and knowledge, the existence of God and the problem of evil, and individual rights and social justice. Emphasizes the relevance that philosophy has to contemporary problems and encourages students to think, read, write, and speak critically and thoughtfully.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
PHIL 110 World Religions3 cr

Examines basic texts, concepts, presuppositions, and ways of life of several major religious traditions. Drawing on both sacred texts and scholarly analyses, as well as fictional and journalistic accounts, the course aims to understand and assess the meaning of religion in human life.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
PHIL 110H Honors: World Religions3 cr

Examines basic texts, concepts, presuppositions and ways of life of several major religious traditions. Drawing on both sacred texts and scholarly analyses, as well as fictional and journalistic accounts, the course aims to understand and assess the meaning of religion in human life.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH), Honors Program (HONR)  
PHIL 200 Logic and Critical Reasoning3 cr

Examines and applies the principles of cogent, sound or critical reasoning and writing, leading to a deeper understanding of language and of the use of logical argumentation. Considers, in the context of real life arguments and claims, (in the rhetoric of philosophy, history and other disciplines) formal and informal principles of clear and systematic thinking and writing.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
PHIL 200H Honors: Logic and Critical Reasoning3 cr

Examines and applies principles of cogent, sound or critical reasoning and writing, leading to a deeper understanding of language and of the use of logical argumentation. Considers, in the context of real-life arguments and claims (in the rhetoric of philosophy, history, and other disciplines) formal and informal principles of clear and systematic thinking and writing.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH), Honors Program (HONR)  

Self & Society

ANTH 130 Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology3 cr

Introduces students to the basic concepts, theories and methodologies of sociocultural anthropology. Creates an awareness of the wide spectrum of cultural variation throughout the world. Demonstrates that through the study of anthropology, we may not only gain an understanding of "exotic" cultures but also of our own sociocultural experience.

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Self & Society (CSS)  
ANTH 240 Peoples of the World3 cr

Exposes students to the concepts and methods of sociocultural anthropology through the examination of several cultural groups around the world. Delves into several important topics within anthropology such as economic systems, indigenous peoples, migration, and health. Introduces and practices basic anthropological methods.

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Self & Society (CSS)  
BADM 100 Explorations in Business3 cr

Introduces students to the basic functions of business and management through examination of contemporary issues in businesses and organizations. Topics include management of human and financial resources, production and marketing of goods and services, and legal and ethical issues in decision-making. Provides students with basic competencies in business communications and research methods, and illustrates both successful/unsuccessful decision-making.

Prerequisite: Open to all except junior/senior Business Administration majors  
Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 101 Contemporary Issues in Society3 cr

Identifies and analyzes significant social issues from one's own cultural context to gain a broader perspective of contemporary society. Explores four themes of understanding ourselves and our social context - people's origins, the socialization process, difference and inequality, and global connectedness. Examines these themes through multiple social science perspectives.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 102 Snapshots of Society3 cr

Compares theories about human origins and their place in the world. Explores the relationship between ourselves as individuals and the broader society. Examines how social forces shape our existence as selves of a particular race, gender and class. Identifies key institutions and investigates the dynamics of power.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 110 Topics in Self and Society3 cr

Examines fundamental concepts regarding the relationship of the individual to society at large. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCSS 202 World Regions and the New Global Order3 cr

Studies the economic, political, cultural and physical characteristics of the major regions of the world and the countries within them; discusses how these regions and countries relate and interact at the international level.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 210 Landscapes of Human Activities3 cr

Provides an understanding of the fundamental identifying traits of a culture; the economic, social, and political systems and institutions societies erect; the cultural landscapes they create; and the impacts societies have on natural systems.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
CCSS 260 Schools, the Law and Society3 cr

Enables students to explore legislation and judicial decisions affecting school policies. Covers separation of church and state, controversial curricula and rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Compares America with other cultures regarding equal access to education.

Prerequisite: 100-level Self & Society course  
Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 264 Mathematics of Fairness and Equity3 cr

Stresses the connections between contemporary mathematics and modern society by identifying important social problems and conflicts and applying quantitative methods to solve these problems or resolve conflicts. Utilizes the notion of "enlightened citizenry," when students acquire broad knowledge of social problems and are able to apply quantitative methods to make personal judgements and decisions, as well as challenge our basic assumptions regarding a social setting.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
CCSS 264H Honors: Mathematics of Fairness and Equity3 cr

Stresses the connections between contemporary mathematics and modern society by identifying important social problems and conflicts and applying quantitative methods to solve these problems or resolve conflicts. Utilizes the notion of "enlightened" citizenry," when students acquire broad knowledge of social problems and are able to apply quantitative methods to make personal judgements and decisions, as well as challenge our basic assumptions regarding a social setting.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Honors Program (HONR)  
CCSS 268 Culture and the Body3 cr

Examines the body as a universal experience, a historical and cultural creation, and an ethical issue with policy implications. Explores our understanding of the foundations of our treatment of the body, the relationship between socialization and body image, how bodily difference has been used as a basis for inequality, and the impact of globalization on the circulation of body images and the exploitation of bodies. Considers ways in which harmful practices have been challenged and modified.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
CCSS 269 Education and Society3 cr

Studies the role of education as an institution in our society, the world and their lives. Through the use of a wide variety of sources, students will become aware of the people and the historical events that played a role in the development of educational practices and issues, and will be able to compare the myths to the realities of this major institution.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
COMM 204 Media Self-Identity & Society3 cr

Introduces the concept of self-identity, examining it within the contexts of gender, sexuality, health, and ethnicity across media and society. Using interdisciplinary approaches, this cultural studies course focuses upon themes and theories that explore identity through analyzing meanings in media and social/cultural texts. It questions how these develop across history and questions identity in everyday common sense discourse and its relationships to media and society at local and global levels.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
ECON 141 Macroeconomics3 cr

Examines the organization of American economic systems, with comparisons to those of other countries. Emphasis is on the problems of unemployment, inflation, budget deficits and the possible fiscal and monetary policies used to correct them. The course studies such aggregate economic variables as consumption, investment, government expenditures, and taxes.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
ENGL 231 The Power of Words3 cr

Explores the way words and symbols shape human thought, behavior and institutions. Traces how meanings arise, why communication is hazardous, and what makes messages subject to misinterpretation. Provides useful tools for functioning in a world in which language can be misleading and even destructive.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Leadership Minor (LDRS)  
HLTH 150 Introduction to Community and Public Health3 cr

Introduces the fields of Public Health, Health Education and Health Promotion. Topics will include the history of public health, health status, health care philosophy, health and wellness, chronic and infectious diseases, health-related behavior, health theories and program models. Students will learn to use library databases and write a review of health-related literature. A service learning component will allow students to establish projects and relationships that will benefit the community.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
HLTH 150H Honors: Introduction to Community and Public Health3 cr

Introduces the fields of Public Health, Health Education and Health Promotion. Topics will include the history of public health, health status, health care philosophy, health and wellness, chronic and infectious diseases, health-related behavior, health theories and program models. Students will learn to use library databases and write a review of health-related literature. A service learning component will allow students to establish projects and relationships that will benefit the community.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Honors Program (HONR)  
HLTH 210 Human Growth and Development3 cr

Explores the life cycle from conception to death. Biological, sociological and psychological perspectives will be examined and applied to everyday situations and social issues.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
IDST 299 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies3 cr

Introduces students to approaches, methods and themes in interdisciplinary studies. Draws on concepts and approaches from selected academic disciplines (such as sociology, history, political science, psychology, cultural studies) to develop interdisciplinary frameworks for the study of important issues in society. Course topic identified by subtitle (e.g. Introduction to Urban Studies, Prison, Punishment, and Society).

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
POSC 201 United States Government3 cr

Introduces the major institutions of national and state government and the discipline of political science. Through interdisciplinary study, students will develop an understanding of political behavior and the public policy processes in the United States.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
POSC 202 Comparative Government3 cr

Provides a comparative introduction to common political problems and the discipline of political science. Through an interdisciplinary study of various nation-states, students will develop an understanding of political behavior, political institutions, and public policy processes.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology3 cr

Introduces students to the science of psychology, presenting the basic principles of mental processes and behavior. To introduce the process of empirical investigation, research participation is required.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
PSYC 230 Social Psychology3 cr

Examines human social behavior emphasizing environmental and situational factors. Theoretical and applied issues are considered within selected topics. (Psychology majors cannot receive core Self & Society credit for PSYC 230).

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or any Self and Society course  
Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Leadership Minor (LDRS)  
SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology3 cr

Introduces the history, major concepts, and methods of sociology. Examines elements of social organization, sociological analysis of groups and relationships between major institutions of society. Emphasizes the idea of the sociological imagination and its application to contemporary issues.

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Self & Society (CSS)  
SOCI 201 Social Problems3 cr

Studies problems and disorganization in modern industrial society such as: poverty, racism, sexism, environmental pollution, militarism and family issues.

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Self & Society (CSS)  
SOCI 210 Families3 cr

Explores contemporary American families (the forms they take, the functions they serve, the problems they face) within the context of families of other historical time periods, and other cultures. Presents an interdisciplinary examination of topics such as: gender roles, marriage, divorce and blended families, nonmarital lifestyles, parenting, family policy and technology's impact on family life.

Attributes: Child & Family Studies Minor (C&FS), Core Self & Society (CSS), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
SOCI 282 Social Constructions of Deviance3 cr

Analyzes social definitions of and responses to deviance, as well as explanations of its causes. Examines drug and alcohol use and abuse, mental illness, sexual and gender differences, and other issues frequently considered deviant.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS)  
WGSS 201 Introduction to Women Gender and Sexuality Studies3 cr

Explores the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural forces that inform sex, gender, and sexuality within the context of feminist movements. Students learn and engage with concepts and theoretical perspectives found in the field of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Understand the multiple matrices of power that shape the world and our lived experiences.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  

Science & Technology

BIOL 103 Nutrition for Healthy Living3 cr

Introduces the non-major to the importance of diet for present and future good health. Examines the importance of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals, and their interactions. Explores topics such as label-reading, popular diets, dietary analysis, and other issues of current interest in the field of nutrition. Students may take either BIOL 102 (4 credit lab course) or BIOL 103 (3 credit non-lab course) but not both.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
BIOL 105 Human Biology3 cr

Provides the non-major with the knowledge about the structure and function of the human body. Students will develop ability to critically evaluate a large number of issues in this field, as presented in scientific publications and the news media. Students will gain a foundation essential for making knowledgeable decisions regarding quality of life. Students will be encouraged to share experiences based on their own culture and gender.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
CCST 101 Topics in Physical Science3 cr

Designed for non-STEM majors, this course will examine fundamental concepts in physical science. Scientific reasoning, discovery, and invention provide a context for understanding reality-based applications of science. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCST 102 A Case Study Approach to Science3 cr

Introduces students to the use of the scientific method in various scientific settings. Using the case study method, students will cover a diverse range of topics which may include such topics as: the effects of radiation on biological systems, cancer and waste water treatment.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
CCST 103 Quarks to Quasars3 cr

Develops the student's understanding of the physical universe, from the smallest constituents of matter to the most distant, energetic structures known. The student will come to know how the scientific method guides us as we seek new knowledge. Conservation laws, the relationship between energy and matter, the need for mathematics and the inexorable links between the various branches of science will be considered.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
CCST 105 The Chemistry of CSI3 cr

Illustrates the intricate role that chemistry plays in solving crimes through the introduction and understanding of basic chemical principles. Forensic techniques such as fingerprint analysis, fiber identification, drug identification and DNA profiling will be introduced. Case studies and "CSI" episodes will be used to explore the scientific foundation for the examination of physical, chemical and biological evidence. This course is intended for non-science majors.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
CCST 105H Honors: The Chemistry of CSI3 cr

Illustrates the intricate role that chemistry plays in solving crimes through the introduction and understanding of basic chemical principles. Forensic techniques such as fingerprint analysis, fiber identification, drug identification and DNA profiling will be introduced. Case studies and "CSI" episodes will be used to explore the scientific foundations for the examination of physical, chemical, and biological evidence. This course is intended for non-science majors.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST), Honors Program (HONR)  
CCST 106 The Physics of Superheroes3 cr

Examines superheroes through the lens of modern physics. The student will use basic physics principles such as mechanics, energy, and quantum mechanics to model and explain the powers and events in literature, which consists of comic books, sci-fi novels, and fantasy novels. This course will develop problem solving skills that are useful in a variety of real world applications. This course assumes no previous knowledge of physics and will be useful for science and non-science majors alike.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
CCST 111 Topics in Life Science3 cr

Designed for non-STEM majors, this course will examine fundamental concepts in the life sciences. Scientific reasoning and discovery provide a context for understanding reality-based applications of science. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENVI 226 Nature of New England3 cr

Surveys the nature of New England and focuses on the natural history and identification of representative vertebrate animals of the region. The first part of the course will introduce the physical setting of New England. Subsequently, it will cover various communities and ecosystems of the region, identify the distinguishing vegetation for selected ecosystems, describe the natural history of those ecosystems, and emphasize the identity, biology, and ecology of representative vertebrate animals.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ERTH 245 Natural Hazards3 cr

Studies natural processes which are hazardous in the context of human activities, including relevant geologic, geomorphic, climatic, and meteorologic phenomena; examines the origin and significance of selected hazards from natural and human perspectives and explores how people underestimate or misjudge risk.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ERTH 270 Weather and Climate3 cr

Examines general meteorological and climatic characteristics through space and time, especially as influenced by temperature, wind, and moisture. Explains atmospheric disturbances at planetary, regional, and local scales.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
HLTH 201 Exercise Science3 cr

Facilitates an understanding of exercise based on the principles related to training basics, energy systems, muscular fitness and biomechanics. Students will learn to develop training programs for better physical performance and health.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  
PHYS 140 Astronomy3 cr

Looks at historical and modern aspects of astronomy. Topics covered will include: the Earth-Moon system, our solar system, galaxies, the observable universe, as well as current research in astronomy, including quasars, pulsars, black holes, other planetary systems and the search for extraterrestrial life.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/o lab (CST)  

Science & Technology with a Lab

BIOL 100 Concepts in Biology4 cr

Provides the non-major knowledge of basic biological concepts. Concepts in Biology deals with the development of concepts in the biological science of life. Among the areas to be studied are evolution, genetics, and developmental biology: all deal with the fundamental characteristic of life: its ability to replicate over time. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
BIOL 102 Nutrition for Healthy Living with Lab4 cr

Introduces the non-major to the importance of diet for present and future good health. Examines the importance of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals, and their interactions. Explores topics such as label-reading, popular diets, dietary analysis, and other issues of current interest in the field of nutrition. Required laboratory. Students may take either BIOL 102 (4 credit lab course) or BIOL 103 (3 credit non-lab course) but not both.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
BIOL 150 Introduction to Biology I: Cells4 cr

Introduces the student to cell biology, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, photosynthesis, respiration and cellular organisms. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students pursuing a major/minor in science. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
BIOL 255 Biodiversity4 cr

Provides the non-major with focus on global, regional and local patterns of biological diversity and processes that influence these patterns. Central to discussions of biodiversity pattern and process will be scientific principles from ecology, evolution and conservation biology. The impact of humans on natural systems and biodiversity loss will also be discussed. Case studies will be used to illustrate biodiversity loss and proposals to protect and restore biodiversity. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
CCST 110 Topics in Physical Science with Laboratory4 cr

Designed for non-STEM majors, this course will examine fundamental concepts in physical science. Scientific reasoning, discovery, and invention provide a context for understanding reality-based applications of science. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle. Required laboratory

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCST 112 Topics in Life Science with Lab4 cr

Designed for non-STEM majors, this course will examine fundamental concepts in life science. Scientific reasoning, discovery, and invention provide a context for understanding reality-based applications of science. Topics will vary by semester and be identified by subtitle. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
CCST 230 Energy and the Environment4 cr

Looks at the impact of current energy usage on our environment from technical, social and political viewpoints. Investigates the present and projected usage of nonrenewable fuel sources and how modifications due to alternate energy techniques will affect current energy policy. Discusses possible large-scale alternate energy methods. Investigates the scientific aspects of such topics as global warming and ozone depletion. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
CHEM 150 Introduction to Chemistry I4 cr

Studies chemical principles, theories, laws and their applications. Topics include electronic and nuclear behavior, periodicity, stoichiometry, structure and bonding. Teaches laboratory techniques through the performance of experiments related to the above topics. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
CHEM 152 Introduction to Chemistry II4 cr

Studies chemical principles, theories, laws and their applications. Topics include oxidation and reduction, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Teaches laboratory techniques through the performance of experiments related to the above topics. Required laboratory.

Prerequisite: CHEM 150  
Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ENVI 150 Introduction to Environmental Systems4 cr

Provides a foundation in the physical, chemical and biological principles of environmental science in order to explore Earth's terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric systems. Directly investigates freshwater and forest environments of the northeast in the context of the scientific method. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ENVI 150H Honors: Introduction to Environmental Systems4 cr

Provides an interdisciplinary foundation in the physical, chemical and biological principles of environmental science in order to explore earth's terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric systems. Historical case studies illustrate political and ethical dimensions of environmental issues. Lab exercises familiarize you with the forest and freshwater environments of the northeast and how the scientific method is used to analyze and understand the relation between humans and the natural environment. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI), Honors Program (HONR)  
ENVI 225 Nature of New England4 cr

Surveys the nature of New England and focuses on the natural history and identification of representative vertebrate animals of the region. It will introduce the physical setting of New England, investigate various communities and ecosystems of the region, and discuss nature in winter and how animals cope with the extremes of winter. The class format includes lecture, student presentations, and class discussions of assigned readings. Required lab component that includes field based activities.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ERTH 151 Introduction to Physical Geography4 cr

Studies the natural environment from a geographical perspective. Analyzes the distribution and character of environmental elements, including weather, climate, landforms, soils, and vegetation. Examines consequences of human intervention in natural systems. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ERTH 152 Introduction to Physical Geology4 cr

Studies the earth, including the origin and types of earth materials, volcanism and crystal deformation, external earth processes and development of landscapes, geological resources, and geological processes as natural hazards. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ERTH 271 Landforms4 cr

Examines the description, origin, classification, and interpretation of landforms. Analyzes geologic, climatic, and biologic factors as landform controls and shows that certain geomorphic processes are natural hazards. Required laboratory

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL), Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
PHYS 120 Introduction to Engineering4 cr

Introduces students to basic scientific methodology, current problems and fundamental principles of engineering design. Intended for nonscience majors and potential engineering students. Required laboratory introduces fundamental science and engineering principles through collaborative projects such as robotics. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
PHYS 131 General Physics I4 cr

This is the first of a two-semester sequence, designed primarily for students in the biological and health sciences and others who desire a rigorous but non-calculus-based course that presents a complete introduction to physics. Covers vectors, one and two dimensional motion, Newton's laws, and rotational motion, conservation of energy and momentum, gravitation, wave motion, sound, heat and thermodynamics. Required laboratory.

Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
PHYS 132 General Physics II4 cr

This is the second of a two-semester sequence, designed primarily for students in the biological and health sciences and others who desire a rigorous but non-calculus-based course that presents a complete introduction to physics. Covers geometrical optics, electricity and magnetism, electronics, modern physics, relativity. Required laboratory.

Prerequisite: PHYS 131   
Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
PHYS 151 Introduction to Mechanics4 cr

First course in a three-course introductory physics sequence which utilizes a calculus-based approach to study the natural world. This course focuses on kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. Required laboratory.

Prerequisite: MATH 150 or MATH 220 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 220  
Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  
PHYS 251 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism4 cr

Second course in a three-course introductory physics sequence which utilizes a calculus-based approach to study the natural world. This course focuses on electricity and magnetism, including Maxwell's Laws. Required laboratory.

Prerequisite: PHYS 151, MATH 220  
Attributes: Core Science & Tech w/lab (CSTL)  

Capstone Experience

CCAP 300 Capstone Seminar:3 cr

Challenges students to integrate knowledge from several disciplines, applying academic learning and critical thinking skills to modern-day issues. Encourages students to work with others and become engaged citizens in the context of today's world.

Prerequisite: Junior status and completion of all Tier I and Tier II requirements  
Attributes: Capstone Experience Tier III (CAP)