Academic Catalog

English (ENGL)

ENGL 100 College Writing I3 cr

Explores the writing process, providing practical strategies and techniques. Emphasis is on constructing texts with attention to various levels of organization and development.

ENGL 150 College Writing II3 cr

Emphasizes college-level writing, reading, research and revision practices necessary for 21st century academic and civic engagement. Teaches students to use a variety of genres, rhetorical techniques, and sources of evidence to reach academic and civic audiences.

Prerequisite: ENGL 100  
Attributes: Critical Reading, Thinking, Writing (CWR)  
ENGL 202 The Personal Essay3 cr

Explores personal essays from the classical era to the present. Uses a workshop format where students write a variety of personal essays, choosing from among meditation, confession, letter, memoir, portrait, prose poem, reportage and humor.

ENGL 207 Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3 cr

Explores the methodological and thematic evolution of American and Ethnic Studies. We will ask: Who is an American? What does it mean to be American? We will approach this task through a critical vantage point that considers the impacts of race, class, gender, and sexuality on "Americanness." We will also explore how economics, empire, racism, transnationalism, and imperialism all impact our definitions of "Americanness."

Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
ENGL 208 Experiments in Creative Writing3 cr

Initiate new storytelling practices inspired by historic literary movements and contemporary writers. The goal is not to perfect stable pieces but to move our writing (fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry) around, via formal conditions, limits, and games.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 210 Essentials of Film3 cr

Focuses on film interpretation by emphasizing elements such as light, sound, composition, camera movement, acting, and direction. Initiates students into developments in film history, film genre and film theory.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 221 Literary Journalism3 cr

Surveys the rich literature of creative nonfiction. Students read and analyze the work of several contemporary literary journalists such as John McPhee, Annie Dillard, Gretel Ehrlich and Joseph Mitchell, as well as a sampling of historical authors, such as Daniel DeFoe and Henry David Thoreau. Students identify themes and techniques of literary journalists and how these are similar to or different from fiction writers. They also have an opportunity to practice writing short pieces in this genre.

ENGL 231 The Power of Words3 cr

Explores the way words and symbols shape human thought, behavior and institutions. Traces how meanings arise, why communication is hazardous, and what makes messages subject to misinterpretation. Provides useful tools for functioning in a world in which language can be misleading and even destructive.

Attributes: Core Self & Society (CSS), Leadership Minor (LDRS)  
ENGL 250 Introduction to Literature3 cr

Seeks to develop each student's ability to understand and respond to a variety of literary texts by repeated practice in textual explication through discussion and written work. While most readings will be drawn from poetry, drama and prose fiction, the course will also embrace, where appropriate, texts drawn from mass media. (English/communications majors may not take ENGL 250 to fulfill their Creative Arts Core Curriculum requirement.)

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
ENGL 250H Honors: Introduction to Literature3 cr

Seeks to develop each students' ability to understand and respond to a variety of literary texts by repeated practice in textual explication through discussion and written work. While most readings will be drawn from poetry, drama and prose fiction, the course will also embrace, where appropriate, texts drawn from mass media.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA), Honors Program (HONR)  
ENGL 265 Literary Theme3 cr

Utilizes both primary and secondary literary and historical sources to explore ways in which a selected theme continually reappears in literature. Texts are examined, interpreted and evaluated within historical contexts; critical and comparative approaches are used to draw conclusions regarding content and context. The specific theme to be examined will vary and will be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Human Heritage (CHH)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 270 Literary Genre3 cr

Examines the question of how an author's choice of a single literary mode, genre, or type affects the meanings of a text. May focus on plays, short stories, song lyrics, comedy, romance, novels, myths, or other genres. The specific genre to be examined will vary and will be identified by subtitle.

Attributes: Core Creative Arts (CCA)  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 300 Creative Writing: Fiction3 cr

Focuses on the craft of fiction and the student's own short stories. Literary works are analyzed for writing techniques, but the emphasis of the course is on constructive criticism of the student's work by peers and by the instructor and on exercises to help develop imagination and skill.

ENGL 301 Creative Writing: Poetry3 cr

Features the art of writing poetry and a critique of the student's own poems. Literary works are analyzed for form and writing techniques, but the emphasis of the course is on constructive criticism of the student's work by peers and by the instructor.

ENGL 302 Creative Writing: Scripts3 cr

Pursues the craft of scripting, focusing on the student's own writing of television, film, theatre, or slide/tape scripts. Published works are analyzed for writing techniques, but the emphasis of the course is on constructive criticism of student work by peers and by the instructor and on exercises that help to develop imagination and visual literacy in the creation of dialogue, characters and action.

ENGL 303 Writing Prose3 cr

Gives students who have completed their foundational studies additional practice and instruction in writing nonfiction prose. Explores the adaptation of such prose to specific contexts. Individual courses may focus on prose writing in a particular discourse community (e.g., business, science and technology, education), which will be identified by subtitle.

Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 304 Creative Writing: Playwriting3 cr

Develops and exercises story-telling abilities through the writing of dramatic works for the stage. Students will explore the Aristotelian elements of classical drama as well as the unities of time, place and action. Through activities designed to improve skills used to create these elements and through close textual analyses of successful models, students will work toward the goal of writing individual producible one-act plays.

ENGL 308 Writing Associate Workshop3 cr

Offers students who desire to work as writing associates both individual and group instruction in ways to respond to student writing. Serves as a forum for discussion of topics relating to being a writing associate at MCLA.

Prerequisite: ENGL 150, permission of instructor  
ENGL 313 Global Anglophone Language and Literature3 cr

Analyzes Global Anglophone Literature and Postcolonial theory with a particular focus on writing from and about Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Discussions will center on questions of language, representation, and form. We will explore the various aesthetic strategies and techniques employed by writers to communicate contemporary postcolonial themes, such as neocolonialism, globalization, nationalism, imperialism, feminism, migration, hybridity, and diaspora.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
ENGL 315 Constructing the Short Film3 cr

Acquaints students with the various aspects of the film production process through the use of videotape. This course gives students an understanding of the kinds of decisions filmmakers encounter and the kinds of techniques they employ. Activities include preparing detailed shooting scripts, experimenting with photography, light, color, motion, sound and editing, and manipulating both live action and animated materials. Individually or in small groups, students will produce a 10-15 minute film.

ENGL 331 The Story of English3 cr

Examines English as the global language of power from the Anglo-Saxon era to today's digitally-connected world and the ways it has been continually transformed by the diverse racial and ethnic communities who have used it. Students explore English's complexity by engaging with multiple genres across a diversity of research traditions, from creative non-fiction, to historical research, to contemporary scholarship in the fields of Writing Studies, Linguistics, and Comparative Rhetorics.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
ENGL 340 Literature and Society3 cr

Discusses and analyzes a variety of literary works that illuminate social issues. Integrates literature with other disciplines by focusing on several contemporary themes of social relevance.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
ENGL 341 Hybrid Poetics3 cr

Investigates a range of experimental literary texts that cross, blur, or recombine different modes and genres of writing, in order to invent new forms of expression. Students explore the porous borders between poetry and prose, the creative and the critical, the visual and the verbal, the oral and the written, the factual and the imaginative. In their own writing, students are invited to move between two types of writing, creative and analytical, that are ordinarily kept separate.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status or instructor approval  
ENGL 341H Honors: Hybrid Poetics3 cr

Investigates a range of experimental literary texts that cross, blur, or recombine different modes and genres of writing, in order to invent new forms of expression. Students explore the porous borders between poetry and prose, the creative and the critical, the visual and the verbal, the oral and the written, the factual and the imaginative. In their own writing, students are invited to move between two types of writing, creative and analytical, that are ordinarily kept separate.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status  
Attributes: Honors Program (HONR)  
ENGL 349 Critical Reading3 cr

Explores different ways of reading a text. Students use diverse critical methods to consider the distinct understandings of a text produced by different reading methods. Examines connections between developments in critical theory and parallel developments in philosophy, art and film criticism and social theory. A variety of critical methods will be examined.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 351 William Shakespeare3 cr

Considers such works as the Sonnets, Midsummer Night's Dream, Measure for Measure and The Tempest.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 353 Hawthorne and Melville3 cr

Studies the chief works of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville with particular attention to their innovations in American letters. Includes such works as Typee, Moby-Dick, Billy Budd, The Scarlet Letter, and The Tanglewood Tales.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 361 John Steinbeck3 cr

Considers the vision of the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men and Travels with Charley. Examines texts drawn from throughout Steinbeck's career, with special attention to the common themes, preoccupations and narrative devices which characterize his works. Readings will be drawn from such works as Cannery Row, The Grapes of Wrath and The Winter of Our Discontent.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 363 Travel Writing3 cr

Examines a variety of travel literatures across multiple modes and genres - including essay, poetry, memoir and fiction - in order to spur students' own writing and thinking processes about how "traveling" happens, from the local to the global. Students explore not only the personal, ethical and ethnographic dimensions of travel, but will create exploratory texts that move and rove, cross borders, pitch questions and field discoveries in which the reader can participate as traveling companion.

ENGL 365 Reading the Graphic Novel3 cr

Explores the graphic novel and related forms. Examines the meaning of the proliferation of this literary form as well as the perceptual mechanisms and processes involved in reading image.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 367 The Beat Generation3 cr

Explores the literature of the Beat Generation, including its antecedents, influences, and lasting legacy. Authors include Ginsberg, Kerouac, Burroughs, Corso, Snyder, McClure, Ferlinghetti, DiPrima, Baraka, Cassady, Johnson, Jones, Bob Dylan, and others.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
ENGL 368 The Age of Milton3 cr

Studies Milton's major works, emphasizing the relation between his development as a poet and the intellectual and social currents of the Puritan Revolution and of the restoration of the monarchy. Includes such works as "On the Morning of Christ's Nativity," "L'Allegro," "II Penseroso," "Lycidas," "Samson Agonistes," and "Paradise Lost".

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 368H Honors: The Age of Milton3 cr

Studies Milton's major works, emphasizing the relation between his development as a poet and the intellectual and social currents of the Puritan Revolution and of the restoration of the monarchy. Includes such works as "On the Morning of Christ's Nativity," "L'Allegro," "II Penseroso," "Lycidas," "Sampson Agonistes," and "Paradise Lost".

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Attributes: Honors Program (HONR)  
ENGL 371 The American Renaissance3 cr

Surveys texts from such authors as Emerson, Dickinson, Thoreau, Alcott, Fuller, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Douglas.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Attributes: Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ENGL 372 Arts of Medieval and Renaissance Britain3 cr

Explores medieval and Renaissance British literature, history and culture. The course includes a spring break travel component. During travel students contextualize literature with the cultural heritage experienced via visual arts architecture, music, theatre, dance, fashion, food, and landscapes and cityscapes of Britain.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250, sophomore status, instructor approval (Students pay travel fee)  
Attributes: Additional Fees Apply (FEE)  
ENGL 372H Honors: Arts of Medieval and Renaissance Britain3 cr

Explores medieval and Renaissance British literature, history and culture. The course includes a spring break travel component. During travel, students contextualize literature with the cultural heritage experienced via the visual arts, architecture, music, theatre, dance, fashion, food, and landscapes and cityscapes of Britain.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250, sophomore status, instructor approval (Students pay travel fee)  
Attributes: Additional Fees Apply (FEE), Honors Program (HONR)  
ENGL 374 Literature and the Environment3 cr

Explores, through literary study, the variety of ways that human beings have regarded our relationship to nature and the environment. Examines some of the many cultural factors conditioning these views, as well as the impact on the environment-and us-when these views are put into practice.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
Attributes: Environmental Studies (ENVI)  
ENGL 375 Civil War in Literature and Film3 cr

Considers texts which focus on the American Civil War for thematic and generic purposes.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 377 Novel in Context3 cr

Examines the genre of the novel written in English, setting it in historical and cultural context. Traces the development of the novel, locating in even its earliest examples characteristic methods and concerns. Explores the prose narratives and epistolary writing of the 17th century as influential predecessors of the novel genre, progressing from that base to studying key examples of novels from the 18th century through the present.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
ENGL 381 African American Literature3 cr

Surveys texts drawn from such writers as Hughes, Dubois, Wright, Morrison, Giovanni, Reed, Douglas, etc.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
ENGL 387 Latino/a American Literature3 cr

Studies texts focusing on the Latino/a experience in the United States. Considers the history of immigration, assimilation, resistance and bi-lingualism which have marked writers placing their vision within the frame of Latino/a history; it will pay particular attention to how such texts set forth a Latino/a experience as both part of and as also distinct from other cultural strands in the United States. Includes such writers as Villareal, Rodriguez, Perez-Firmat, Zamora, Alvares Islas, and Pena.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ)  
ENGL 388 Visions and Voices: American Ethnic Literature and Art3 cr

Explores a range of works (fiction, poetry, memoir, photography, music, painting, news media) from American ethnic writers and artists of the twentieth-century and beyond. This course critically examines the cross-section of ethnicity and creative expression as it applies to questions of American identity. Topics include systemic oppression, nationhood, immigration, marginalization, intersectionality, cultural hybridity, intergenerational trauma and survival, border crossing, and heritage.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status  
Attributes: Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
ENGL 389 Contemporary American Literature:3 cr

Surveys representative literary texts from the margins and boundaries of the American experience. Concentrates on familiarizing students with issues, questions and motifs that recur in works which diagnose ongoing conflicts in the American temper. Readings are drawn from both the margins and mainstream of American literary traditions and all eras. Content identified by subtitle.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 392 Queer Identity in Contemporary Literature3 cr

Explores representations of queer identity by contemporary writers working in a variety of literary genres including short and novel-length fiction, the graphic novel, poetry, and memoir. Authors may include David Leavitt, Jeanette Winterson, Olga Broumas, Colm Toibin, Raphael Campo, Alan Hollinghurst, Leslie Fienberg, Mark Wunderlich, Alison Bechdel, or Michelle Tea.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
Attributes: Cross-Cultural and Social Justice (CCSJ), Women Gender Sexuality Studies (WMST)  
ENGL 393 Faulkner and the Global South3 cr

Explores the reciprocal resonances between the writing of white southern modernist, William Faulkner, and the diverse literatures coming out of the Global South. Examines the ways in which Global South writers use experimental poetics to continue Faulkner's project and tell the stories of colonialism from the neocolonial present.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250  
ENGL 395 Experiential Credit Portfolio Preparation and Writing3 cr

Provides students with help in completing a portfolio for experiential credit. Includes a rigorous essay-writing component.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Advising Center in consultation with the appropriate department(s)  
ENGL 397 Special Topics in Film3 cr

Studies in-depth a specific issue in film and filmmaking linked by one or more common contexts, such as genre and subject matter, or historical, social, economic, philosophical or aesthetic concerns. Students will practice using evidence from those contexts to produce close, critical readings of films that reflect both an understanding of the context and an understanding of the visual and auditory languages of film. Content identified by subtitle.

Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or instructor approval  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 401 Open Up: Community Dialogue Workshop3 cr

A high-impact, community-based learning course that puts students directly in the classroom, leading discussions on important topics, such as race, gender, sexuality, identity, and community. The course centers theoretical and pedagogical discussions grounded in books and articles, such as The New Jim Crow and White Fragility, as well as documentary films, exploring power, society, and identify. Student groups will then develop workshops and partner with local high schools.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status  
ENGL 410 Special Topics in Creative Writing3 cr

Explores new forms, genres, and approaches to the craft of creative writing for advanced students looking to further their creative and critical artistic practices. Content identified by subtitle. Primarily for majors in the junior and senior year.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 412 Filmmakers and Filmmaking3 cr

Studies in depth a number of films by one or a cluster of filmmaking professionals. The professionals may include directors, screenwriters, editors, cinematographers, producers or others. Guides students in understanding the aesthetic, technical, economic and other concerns of various film professionals, leading students to analyze and appreciate a filmmaker's body of work.

Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or instructor approval  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 430 Advanced Poetry Workshop3 cr

Focuses on the work of the individuals in the workshop. The work of established poets is analyzed for method and craft. Weekly writing assignments are critiqued by the class and the instructor for rewriting. There is a final portfolio of 12 to15 poems.

Prerequisite: ENGL 301 or department approval  
ENGL 435 Advanced Fiction Workshop3 cr

Focuses on creating finished short stories. As in ENGL 300, the major emphasis is on constructive criticism of student work by peers and by the instructor.

Prerequisite: ENGL 300 or department approval  
ENGL 441 Special Topics in Literature3 cr

Studies in depth a specific aspect of literature. Designed to provide advanced work in literary analysis, interpretation and research. Primarily for majors in the junior and senior year. Content identified by subtitle.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status or department approval  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 451 British Literary Survey3 cr

Explores the landmark texts in British literature. Readings may include Beowulf and works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Johnson, Wordsworth, Austen, Dickens, Woolf or Joyce.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 461 American Literary Survey3 cr

Explores the landmark texts in the traditions of American literature. Readings may be drawn from the Puritan and Colonial periods and from such writers as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Melville, Dickinson, Twain, James, Pound, Hughes, Eliot, Faulkner, Porter, Ellison and Walker.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 471 World Literary Survey3 cr

Explores myths, epics and other important texts from around the world that have served as repositories of the values of their respective cultures. Also examines more recent texts that stand as efforts to shift those cultural values. Texts studied may include such Greek, Hebrew, Western African, Japanese, Mayan and Islamic texts such as The Odyssey, The Bible, The Epic of Son Jara, The Tale of Genji, Popul Vuh and The Koran.

Prerequisite: ENGL 250 or department approval  
ENGL 481 Special Topics in Mass Communication3 cr

Studies in depth a specific aspect of mass communications. Designed to provide advanced work in media analysis, interpretation and research. Primarily for majors in the junior and senior year. Content identified by subtitle.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status or instructor approval  
Repeatable: Unlimited Credits  
ENGL 490 Senior Seminar3 cr

Provides a capstone course in which majors meet in their final undergraduate year to explore a significant theme or topic. Students integrate what they have learned about language, literature and media, and together the students, pooling their special knowledge in these areas, respond to the specific theme, concept or topic.

Prerequisite: ENGL majors only or department approval  
Repeatable: Maximum of 6 credits  
ENGL 493 Teaching Assistantship in English/Communications1-6 cr

Assists the instructor with the organization, implementation and assessment of individual English/Communications courses.

Prerequisite: Department approval  
Repeatable: Maximum of 6 credits  
ENGL 500 Independent Study1-3 cr

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to read in a given area or to study a topic in depth. Written reports and frequent conferences with the advisor are required.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior status, department approval  
Repeatable: Maximum of 12 credits  
ENGL 540 Internship in English1-15 cr

Provides a practical, hands-on field experience to supplement classroom courses. The student works with an on-campus faculty advisor and usually with an on-site supervisor, and the two jointly evaluate the student's work.

Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing, department approval  
Repeatable: Maximum of 15 credits